Category Archives: Long Term Residence

Belgium: a nice place to visit, but can you afford to live there?

champagne truffles by LinksmanJD flickrBy Thomas Huddleston, MPG Programme Director on Migration and Integration

A 225€ fee for non-EU citizens’ residence permits would set one of the highest fees in the EU. The median fee in the EU is around 130€. While the Minister referred to France and Netherlands–neighbours with some of the EU’s highest fees–he skipped over neighbours with average fees: Germany (100-135€) and Luxembourg (50€). A 225€ fee could contravene EU law by acting as a disproportionate obstacle for low-income immigrants who meet all the legal requirements for family reunification or long-term residence.
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Commission ‘deplores weak impact’ of EU long-term residence directive

Written by Thomas Huddleston, MIPEX Research Coordinator, Co-author and Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Group

Five years after most Member States had to transpose Directive 2003/109/EC, an insignificant number of third-country nationals have become EU long-term residents. Policies restricting access to long-term residence are part of the problem, according to both the European Commission’s Application Report and the MIPEX. Who should be eligible to settle permanently in Europe? What language and integration conditions go against EU law? And what other factors are behind the Directive’s weak impact?

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No to ‘Earned citizenship’: UK Government wants new legislation, but what direction?

Written by Thomas Huddleston, MIPEX Research Coordinator, Co-author and Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Group

The cut-off date for MIPEX III research was 31 May 2010. On 5 November 2010, UK Home Secretary Theresa May announced the government’s intention not to implement ‘earned citizenship.’ The previous UK government made all the legislative changes necessary when Parliament passed the 2009 Borders, Citizenship and Immigration Act. The Home Secretary called the approach “too complicated, bureaucratic, and, in the end, ineffective.”  These points were raised by opposition parties during parliamentary debate (See Report by Immigration Law Practitioners’ Association).

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