Category Archives: EU

Do people want equal rights for immigrants? MIPEX vs. public opinion

Written by Thomas Huddleston, MIPEX Research Coordinator, Co-author and Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Group

Would the public generally support their country’s policies on equal rights for immigrants? 

According to my new analysis, there is no contradiction in the EU between governments granting equal rights and opportunities for immigrants and public support for equal rights. Countries that grant more equal rights to immigrants tend to have more people who support equal rights, see the benefits of immigration to society, and see the need for non-EU labour migration. In these countries, including Denmark, Finland, Italy, and The Netherlands, politicians may discuss restrictions to immigrants’ rights as a reaction to the far-right—but these restrictions do not necessary respond to the opinion of the general public.

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How to Respond to the EU Family Reunion Consultation

On 7 December 2011 the Migration Policy Group held a webinar ‘How to Respond to the EU Family Reunion Consultation‘ where Thomas Huddleston, MPG Policy Analyst and Central Research Coordinator of the MIPEX, presented the four MPG Briefings on Family Reunion and the relevant MIPEX data to assist organisation in drafting their own responses to the EU Consultation. (N.B. The deadline for responses to the Green Paper is 1 March 2012)

The webinar recording is available in two parts. Part 1 is a recording of the presentation by Thomas Huddleston outlining the questions from the EU consultation one by one, as well as presenting data relevant to the consultation. Continue reading

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European Commission asks: How long should families wait to reunite?

Written by Thomas Huddleston, MIPEX Research Coordinator, Co-author and Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Group

Most EU countries require immigrants who want to sponsor their family to hold any type of legal residence permit for one year or less. According to the European Commission, long residence requirements and long lists of excluded permits may create implementation problems and delays, which undermine immigrants’ right to family reunion, enshrined in EU law. The OECD suggests that families who can reunite quickly will catch up more quickly in learning the language and adjusting to their new society. Continue reading

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European Commission asks: When is an adult not an adult?

Written by Thomas Huddleston, MIPEX Research Coordinator, Co-author and Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Group

A couple can be legally married at age 18–but a non-EU couple cannot reunite together under several EU countries’ family reunion rules until age 21. Government and academic studies have evaluated the impacts. Age limits have not proven to be proportionate or effective for integration. There are also better ways to prevent forced marriages, according to former victims and women’s shelters.

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European Commission asks: When is a family not a family?

Written by Thomas Huddleston, MIPEX Research Coordinator, Co-author and Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Group

Does the EU Family Reunion Directive reflect how you would define a family? MPG’s analysis of MIPEX and Eurostat statistics reveals that immigrant’s parents, grandparents, and adult children are somehow entitled to reunite in most countries, but few can or do apply.

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Commission ‘deplores weak impact’ of EU long-term residence directive

Written by Thomas Huddleston, MIPEX Research Coordinator, Co-author and Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Group

Five years after most Member States had to transpose Directive 2003/109/EC, an insignificant number of third-country nationals have become EU long-term residents. Policies restricting access to long-term residence are part of the problem, according to both the European Commission’s Application Report and the MIPEX. Who should be eligible to settle permanently in Europe? What language and integration conditions go against EU law? And what other factors are behind the Directive’s weak impact?

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